micdotcom:

“Pink is just a color:” How one Seattle mom and her sons are destroying gender stereotypes

"Some boys like pink, and why not? Pink is just a color, and so is green, and blue, and yellow. No child should be teased for what they wear," she wrote on her Facebook page. 

Marketing of gender-conforming colors and toys, like blue and pink aisles in kids’ stores or the gender-specific doll and action hero options in fast food meals, can seem inescapable. But the positive response to Zoer’s campaign on social media suggests change is coming — or at the very least, that parents are becoming more aware of the issue.

How you can get involved

What’s the story of your first days in America?

firstdays-globalnation:

image

Some immigrants spent their first nights at the YMCA. Others saw snow for the first time. Some people didn’t mean to end up here at all. What do you — or your parents or grandparents — remember about your first days in the US? Submit your story.

(via pritheworld)

sesamestreet:

Happy Batman Day!

sesamestreet:

Happy Batman Day!

pbstv:

Day 1 of PBS’ portion of the TV Critics Press Tour included sessions on upcoming programs like:

Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts: An Intimate History (airing September 14th, 2014)

MAKERS Women in Hollywood and Women in Politics (premieres September 30th, 2014)

independentlenspbs's Evolution of a Criminal, executive produced by Spike Lee. (premieres January 12th, 2015)

Live from the Lincoln Center’s The Nance starring Nathan Lane. (premieres October 10th, 2014)

America by the Numbers with Maria Hinojosa (premieres October 4th, 2014)

Read more.

micdotcom:

9 human rights tragedies the world needs to stop ignoring

It’s a tragically long list: missing women, ethnic cleansing and spreading diseases. Pick any country — including the United States — and there’s most likely a tragedy you’ll uncover that seriously violates international laws and standards. While unleashing international outrage can sometimes hurt more than it helps, there are some situations where it can make a real impact. 

Here are 9 that deserve more attention | Follow micdotcom 

nprglobalhealth:

In The World Of Global Gestures, The Fist Bump Stands Alone
Back in the 2008 presidential campaign, candidate Barack Obama launched a media storm when he nonchalantly fist bumped his wife Michelle. “Obama’s Fist-bump Rocks The Nation!: The Huffington Post exclaimed. “Is the fist bump the new high-five?” NPR’s Laura Silverman asked.
Obama has done it again.
Earlier this month he cemented the gesture as part of his presidential persona when he fist bumped an employee at an Austin barbecue restaurant. Before taking Obama’s order, Daniel Rugg said, “Equal rights for gay people,” the Austin Chronicle reported. Then the presidential bump followed.
All this fist-to-fist action got us thinking: Where did the fist bump come from? Why is it so appealing that the president uses it? And do other cultures have similar nonverbal gestures?
The modern fist bump most likely evolved from the high-five in the sports world, says David Givens, an anthropologist with the Center for Nonverbal Studies in Spokane, Washington. The 1970s Baltimore Bullets guard Fred Carter was an early bumper, Time reported back in 2008. Eventually the fist bump became a way for friends to greet each other.
Givens believes that the fist bump stands out in the world of nonverbal gestures. “The fist bump is one of the few gestures that is equal,” he tells Goats and Sodas. “You could do it with President Obama, and you’d both be equals at that time.”
That’s because the knuckles are meeting at the same level — neither bumper has the upper hand, so to speak.
Continue reading.
Photo by Meredith Rizzo/NPR

nprglobalhealth:

In The World Of Global Gestures, The Fist Bump Stands Alone

Back in the 2008 presidential campaign, candidate Barack Obama launched a media storm when he nonchalantly fist bumped his wife Michelle. “Obama’s Fist-bump Rocks The Nation!: The Huffington Post exclaimed. “Is the fist bump the new high-five?” NPR’s Laura Silverman asked.

Obama has done it again.

Earlier this month he cemented the gesture as part of his presidential persona when he fist bumped an employee at an Austin barbecue restaurant. Before taking Obama’s order, Daniel Rugg said, “Equal rights for gay people,” the Austin Chronicle reported. Then the presidential bump followed.

All this fist-to-fist action got us thinking: Where did the fist bump come from? Why is it so appealing that the president uses it? And do other cultures have similar nonverbal gestures?

The modern fist bump most likely evolved from the high-five in the sports world, says David Givens, an anthropologist with the Center for Nonverbal Studies in Spokane, Washington. The 1970s Baltimore Bullets guard Fred Carter was an early bumper, Time reported back in 2008. Eventually the fist bump became a way for friends to greet each other.

Givens believes that the fist bump stands out in the world of nonverbal gestures. “The fist bump is one of the few gestures that is equal,” he tells Goats and Sodas. “You could do it with President Obama, and you’d both be equals at that time.”

That’s because the knuckles are meeting at the same level — neither bumper has the upper hand, so to speak.

Continue reading.

Photo by Meredith Rizzo/NPR

(via npr)

propublica:

The number of people put on death row in the U.S., vs the number actually executed. (Source: The Upshot) 

propublica:

The number of people put on death row in the U.S., vs the number actually executed. (Source: The Upshot) 

npr:

What ‘The Golden Girls’ Taught Us About AIDS" via Barbara Fletcher

"But this is what The Golden Girls was so good at: bringing home those topics that often made people uncomfortable — racism, homosexuality, older female sexuality, sexual harassment, the homeless, addiction, marriage equality and more — and showing us how interconnected and utterly human we all are at any age. Served, of course, with that delicious trademark humor that infused the show throughout its groundbreaking, taboo-busting seven-season run.”

The Golden Girls is just the best show. 

claauddiaa:

This will never get old! Ahahaha!

claauddiaa:

This will never get old! Ahahaha!

(via eastloshigh)

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